One of the Worst

One of the Worst

When looking for the best possible originals from which to make a restoration, I come across some with uneven quality. For this transcription, which runs 22 pages, I rejected it. There was just too much wrong with it. It was one of the last print runs made from worn-out plates and printed with little care. I’ve provided three examples below; perhaps you have music that looks like this! Finally, I requested John Apple to get me a better printing to use and then return, and he has found a library willing to loan theirs; I hope it’s in good condition.

Part of the plate was worn, to the left of the clefs, and part was fine. The unevenness is a very time consuming thing to repair. Also, not the paper was not properly registered as seen in the curving of staff lines. There was this kind of problem on every page!

Here, the staff lines are straight, but there is unevenness in the shape and ink coverage of the noteheads. Many of these would need to be repaired or replaced. See the half notes on the right in the right hand and pedal and compare them with the left hand. Ugh.

I think you can see the problems in this example. My guess is that the paper was improperly loaded and slid a bit as the plate was pressed to it. But this is seriously defective. This problem occurred in other places as well; the whole line would need to be replaced. I hope the new copy comes in the next month.

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2 Responses to One of the Worst

  1. Melanie says:

    My daughter recently began working for a print shop. I knew printing was complicated, but I am amazed at how much can go wrong in the process. Thank you for helping organists with your music.

  2. Albert says:

    I worked for a time as accountant in a newspaper with a print shop. I hear your pain. I have bought music that looked as bad as that, and it is hard to play from, let alone try to duplicate a nice copy from.

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